Published on 26/01/2022 by

Nevulo profile picture
Nevulo

What is the Nevuletter and how does it work?

Explaining why I started a newsletter, what you get from subscribing and how it works behind the scenes

What is it?

The Nevuletter (Nevulo + newsletter) is a newsletter with a special curation of programming blog posts from myself (

), as well as other awesome content from the community, including helpful articles and neat GitHub projects for you to look at - all delivered right to your inbox every 2 weeks.

You can

for free and I promise I won’t spam you, and no low quality content. I take your privacy seriously.

Why I did it

First the blog, now the Nevuletter!

For some context, for 2022 I had set an internal goal in place to try and release a new blog post every week. I’ll see how I go, but I have a backlog of posts and even more ideas to write about to help people at all levels in programming and discussing a wide variety of topics (different languages, concepts, etc).

The

is separate from the , but works in conjunction with it as every Nevuletter will contain at least 1, 2 or in some cases even 3 fresh blog posts about a variety of topics. The idea behind the Nevuletter is to have a simple way to ship any new content I write as well as other content from the community to your inbox.

Ultimately, my mission for the blog (and in extension the Nevuletter) is making programming concepts more accessible and understandable. Specifically to make them more accessible, I want to have a newsletter where I can ship you a supply crate full of programming knowledge every 2 weeks. I want to provide as much value as I can to developers of all levels (including those just looking to start out) so whenever you’re feeling bored and you see a Nevuletter drop in your inbox, after reading it hopefully you can take away something and use it to help you in your life.

What’s in it for me if I subscribe?

I want to keep the content simple to understand but rich in value at the same time. Keeping that in mind, right now an average Nevuletter will contain the following:

  • some posts/guides that I’ve put out in the past 2 weeks to help you
  • a few articles about relevant programming topics to read including but not limited to new/updated frameworks (not limited by any specific language), interesting lists or statistics, opinion pieces, guides, etc
  • “What’s good on GitHub?” - a segment dedicated to showcasing 2-3 great GitHub repositories that might help you or a project you’re working on
  • a few ideas and inspiration
  • other little bits of information (what’s happening in my life, something I learned, etc)

All that every 2 weeks, not bad!

Every Nevuletter will be slightly different and have a range of content and topics so you’re always learning something new and to keep things interesting - I don’t wanna make people fall asleep when learning about programming! Don’t worry, no matter if you’re a beginner or advanced, I’ll try my best to have something for everyone each time. We’re all here to learn.

How it works

A lot of the heavy lifting is done by a service called

which is an elegant and advanced tool for creating newsletters and integrating it with a website. A lot of the little things like setting a custom domain to send from (you’ll receive the Nevuletter from [email protected]), hosting a custom site for people to subscribe, and a rich API to send information and set up a custom subscription form for my website.

I combed through a lot of different services, some which satisfied some needs, but not others, but settled on Buttondown for its simplicity and focus on privacy - at the end of the day, I just want to send quality content that brings value to your inbox.

A lot of the things like writing the newsletter, subscriptions, and styling are all handled through Buttondown which is really nice, so there’s not much for me to manage on the technical side for me. I had to do a few things like setting up DNS records to be able to send emails from my nevulo.xyz domain and write some code to connect the subscription form on my website to the Buttondown API, but nothing crazy.

I write the newsletter using “

”, a mark-up language which allows me to add basic formatting (for titles, subtitles, images). There is some HTML involved when writing the newsletter content, because I wanted to have a nice, modern design for previews to articles or my blog content. I eventually want to have a standardised way of generating HTML embeds to put in the newsletter, but for now I’m still kind of playing around with the previews.

Conclusion

I’m really excited about the Nevuletter and integrating it with my blog to send you high quality content from myself and others in the community every 2 weeks. I’ll be experimenting around with a few things to make learning about programming concepts more engaging/exciting, and giving as much value as I can to subscribers.

One last thing: Nevuletter is also a “pay what you want” newsletter - you can subscribe completely for free but if you wish to support future issues, feel free to put any monthly amount you’d like. There’s no pressure whatsoever, I greatly appreciate any support and it helps me to curate even better content for subscribers.

You can subscribe to the Nevuletter

. Unsubscribe at any time.

Comments

0

You need to be signed in to comment